A Lovely Aspect of Homeschooling

One of the absolute best aspects of homeschooling for me, personally, is discovering new interests right alongside my children.

We’re trying something new this year. Last year we were part of a local Charlotte Mason co-op, which won’t work this year due to scheduling conflicts, and we learned about different composers and their music, artists and their art, poets and their poetry, and we did nature study outside using nature notebooks to record findings.

Those subjects of study may seem peripheral to most people and even to the public school system, from what I can tell, but I believe that they form a foundation for an appreciation of the finer things of life, as well as for a greater understanding of the world and culture we live in, and I can’t imagine ignoring these subjects, despite the fact that the co-op isn’t going to work for us right now.

We were able to base nearly all of our minor subjects on the lives of musicians, artists, and poets last year. Geography, social studies, some musical math, a bit of science, and even some history have all been brought alive by the music, art, and poetry of various countries, time periods, and individuals. I can turn on classical music and my children can tell me what instruments are being used, what type of music it likely is, and sometimes which composer wrote it. My children can immediately recognize the style of Impressionism when faced with an unfamiliar painting and I look forward to introducing them to many more styles as we continue throughout the years.

Anyhow, this year, given the situation and also to help my children handle the disappointment of not being able to see their friends for co-op, I had my oldest (8yo) choose our first subjects of study. She has chosen Degas for our artist, Tchaikovsky for our composer, Rose Fyleman for our poet, and to begin with leaves for nature study. Her next younger sister will get to choose the next set of topics once we have thoroughly examined this first set 🙂

Throughout the process of gathering books and information on Degas, I’m apparently developing a great appreciation for art. I’ve always been more musically inclined, but I suddenly have found an appreciation where there wasn’t any before. It’s invigorating to find good sources, books about his life and works, and documentaries to fill our days that aren’t going to be quite as productive due to various factors.

This year is looking far more promising than I had previously expected it to be and all the children are thrilled to be so involved in the choosing of our poet, composer, and artist. I, also, am looking forward to continuing to develop more of an appreciation for art and poetry alongside my children and for my children to continue developing a great appreciation for the great composers, which has been my greatest pleasure to share with them ❤

Nursing in Public

I read an excellent article yesterday about all of the public places/situations where it is inappropriate to breastfeed. Amazingly enough, as a strong breastfeeding proponent, I agreed with it!

Five Places Where Breastfeeding is Certainly Inappropriate

A friend of mine reposted the article and one of her friends commented about the “courtesy” of breastfeeding women not “drawing undue attention to their exposed anatomy” and of being modest. In my somewhat limited experience, those are some of the most common reasons given by people who seek to restrict where a woman is able to feed her baby in the biologically normal way. Given that our society still has a great many social biases towards *artificial baby-milk feeding, I believe that it is of extreme importance to address those biases whenever I see them.

This was my response:

It’s also courteous to look away if someone is nursing and showing too much skin for your comfort. I would ask you, very respectfully, to consider the following:

Perhaps the hypothetical woman who is “drawing undue attention” to the act of feeding her baby is just starting out with nursing. Perhaps her baby won’t nurse with a cover (most babies I know personally refuse to nurse while covered up). Perhaps she wore something that (in retrospect and to her great embarrassment) wasn’t the most practical nursing attire. Or perhaps her baby needed to nurse immediately due to hunger or injury, leaving no time for the mother to be overly concerned with the opinions or even sensibilities of adult strangers who can easily avert their eyes if their sensibilities are offended.

Perhaps the fact that the mother could have very valid, non-exhibitionist, reasons for not being as modest as some might prefer could help you see that (rare, in my experience) occurrence in a different and more positive light than as, negatively stated above, a purposeful drawing of attention or lack of modesty.

 

Babies need to be fed. If a baby is hungry, then they should be fed as quickly as possible. Preferably with breastmilk, but with formula where necessary for whatever reason. If someone can bottle-feed in a location or situation, then mothers should be able to also breastfeed in that same location or situation. Feeding a baby is not a sexual act. Breasts are primarily organs for feeding babies, not for titillating the males in our species.

*I am not anti-formula and I fully understand that it is necessary to feed babies artificial baby-milk under several circumstances. The first rule of feeding babies is “Feed the baby” and many babies thrive on formula. However, I also believe that we do a disservice to both babies and mothers, as well as society as a whole, when we pretend that artificial baby-milk is in any way comparable to breastmilk or ignore the fact that there are very real disadvantages, and even dangers, to feeding babies formula when compared to breastfeeding directly or feeding babies breastmilk from a bottle.

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